New paper: Oculomotor inhibition covaries with conscious detection

Congratulations to Alex White, whose postdoc project just appeared in the Journal of Neurophysiology! The key finding of this paper is that the pattern of miniature eye movements immediately following the appearance of a stimulus—the reflexive inhibition of so-called microsaccades—reveals whether the observer has seen that stimulus or not. To some extent, this subjective perception … Continue reading New paper: Oculomotor inhibition covaries with conscious detection

New paper: Saccadic adaptation to a systematically varying disturbance

Carlos, Sven, and Martin just had a new paper accepted in the Journal of Neurophysiology. As the title suggests, we show saccadic adaptation to a systematically varying disturbance. We are particularly happy about this work as it establishes a new paradigm to study plasticity in the saccadic system that—as we argue at length in the paper—allows … Continue reading New paper: Saccadic adaptation to a systematically varying disturbance

In press: Spotlight on Remapping attention pointers

Because the eyes move, the correspondence between each location in the world and each location on the retina is arbitrary. From one fixation to the next, each object changes places on the retina. Both psychophysical and neurophysiological studies aim to better understand how we keep track of locations as the eyes move about. Yet the links between neural and behavioral findings remain obscure. Inspired by … Continue reading In press: Spotlight on Remapping attention pointers

New grant with Tamara Watson (Western Sydney, Australia)

We just obtained notice that Universities Australia and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) will fund our collaboration with Tamara Watson at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. The grant supports travel costs in both directions. Tamara will join our lab in Berlin during her sabbatical in the spring of 2016. Martin will have funds to travel to Sydney in … Continue reading New grant with Tamara Watson (Western Sydney, Australia)

In press: What draws the line between perception and cognition?

Together with Michael Dambacher, Martin has submitted a comment on the recent theoretical paper "Cognition does not affect perception: Evaluating the evidence for ‘top-down’ effects" by Chaz Firestone and Brian Scholl (Yale University). The comment has now been accepted for publication. It will appear along with a number of other comments and a response by the authors in a (hopefully … Continue reading In press: What draws the line between perception and cognition?

Bernstein Sparks Workshop on Active Perceptual Memory

We are pleased to announce the Bernstein Sparks Workshop on Active Perceptual Memory. The goal of this workshop is to bring together recent developments in perceptual memory and active perception—in particular eye movements—to capitalize on the numerous potential empirical and theoretical interfaces between these fields of research.   Where and when: Berlin, Germany, on October 26-27, 2015.   … Continue reading Bernstein Sparks Workshop on Active Perceptual Memory

New paper on remapping in schizophrenia

Our collaboration with Katy Thakkar and her colleagues at Utrecht University has just assumed tangible shape. Our manuscript "Failure to use corollary discharge to remap visual target locations is associated with psychotic symptom severity in schizophrenia" has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Neurophysiology (which is becoming my favorite journal). In our study, we compared … Continue reading New paper on remapping in schizophrenia

Yarbus-100 keynote article in press in Perception

Last September, Martin had the unique opportunity to participate in a small and most memorable meeting in the Russian woods near Nizhny Novgorod, at the banks of the Volga River. The meeting celebrated what would have been the 100th birthday of Alfred L. Yarbus, a true pioneer of eye movement research. It was organized by some of his former … Continue reading Yarbus-100 keynote article in press in Perception